What a 170 year old beer from a shipwreck tastes like

Boffins have discovered and opened a 170-Year-Old beer from a shipwreck and wanted to find out what 19th-century beer was like.

The taste …

They say it tastes grim, like sour milk and burnt rubber (they had a sneaky snifter while the chemists weren’t looking).

The smells …

The beer had a ripe mixture of smells: yeast extract, dimethyl sulfide (think cabbage), Bakelite (a fishy smelling retro plastic), burnt rubber, overripe cheese, goat and sulphur – let’s hope that they are never asked to write tasting notes for the beer snobs.

The appearance …

The description of the appearance of the beer was stated as a “bright golden yellow, with little haze”, which sounds promising and a much better description for marketing – maybe they do have a marketing bent amongst them.

Expert view …

Professor Plum stated, under duress, and after feeling a little bilious, that the was one of the most most matured beers he’d ever drunk, and he has experience too, he’s tried loads.

He also said, “The taste of this rancid, and much matured brew reminds be of pubs in the old days where a good beer line clean was unheard of on a regular basis. It brings back memories of the good times where the taste of every pint was a surprise and you never really knew how bad, or good ,it was going to be before you tasted it”.

Some seawater had seeped into the bottles, and decades of bacterial activity gave the beer some rather unpleasant notes, but the Professor proudly stated that he would do anything in the name of research, and concluded that the beers original flavours probably would have been similar to those of modern beers.

More research needed …

He added that “more research was quickly needed”, and thus went out to taste a lots of modern beers, and, pending research funding (and the ability to type up his work) more insights would be published soon.

He is looking forward to the other salty delights that have been discovered from the wreckage that sank near Finland’s Aland Islands in the 1840s … he has yet to sample and “research” the 150 bottles of champagne.

We asked the lauded Professor for contribution to this article, but sadly he was unavailable.

Sources close to the research department claim that he was unavailable either due to sickness, intoxication, or lack of funding for this world altering research.

The real findings can be found in the Journal of Agricultural & Food Chemistry (link below).

Would you sample it? …

Comment below …

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